Stricken First Responders Tout 9/11 Clinic, Zadroga Act

By Michael Cusenza South & West Forum

9/11 first responders and volunteers John Licato (from l.), Christian Foggy, Joseph Ramondino and Patricia Workman. Photo by Michael Cusenza

9/11 first responders and volunteers John Licato (from l.), Christian Foggy, Joseph Ramondino and Patricia Workman. Photo by Michael Cusenza

On Feb. 14, 2013, John Licato’s life flashed before his eyes; the eyes that this retired city police officer thought had witnessed it all—from the indescribable joy of the birth of his grandchildren, to the agony of human suffering at the hands of terrorists. And it was with those eyes that he watched his doctor inform him he had a malignant tumor in his neck.

“My Valentine’s Day gift,” he said with a smile tinted with a hint of sarcasm. That Tuesday took Licato’s mind back to another harrowing Tuesday, and what would ultimately become the cause of his cancer. On the morning of September 11, 2001, Licato, a Howard Beach resident, was finishing up his midnight tour at the 110th Precinct in Corona when he heard about the attack on the Twin Towers. He raced downtown— and stayed working at Ground Zero for months after his nation and city were forever altered.

Licato, 51, was changed as well. The 26-year Navy veteran’s health began to gradually decline. About 11 years later, he felt a lump on the side of his neck. Convinced it was simply a swollen gland, he visited his physician, Dr. Lecher in Howard Beach, who ordered a CAT scan and MRI, and referred Licato to a specialist. Biopsy results proved to be the beginning of the end of the life Licato had led up to that Valentine’s Day.

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Stony Brook Researchers Study PTSD-Respiratory Disease Link from 9/11

By Ridgely Ochs New York Newsday

Responders to the World Trade Center attacks who have post-traumatic stress disorder are twice as likely to develop respiratory diseases compared with those without PTSD, according to a study of thousands of responders.

What’s more, the study found, they are much less likely to have their symptoms diminish compared with those without PTSD.

Although PTSD is not covered in the Victim Compensation Fund under the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010, it and respiratory illnesses — such as asthma, reactive airway disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis — remain persistent and not easily treated among responders exposed to the steaming stew of toxins at Ground Zero.

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‘She is the best of humanity': Man’s delight at professor’s 13 year bid to reunite him with wedding photo found in the rubble of 9/11

By Chris Spargo Daily Mail Online

Lost and found: After 13 years of searching, Elizabeth Stringer Keefe finally managed to reunite this image with its owner Fred Mahe. He worked on the 77th floor of the second World Trade Center tower

Lost and found: After 13 years of searching, Elizabeth Stringer Keefe finally managed to reunite this image with its owner Fred Mahe. He worked on the 77th floor of the second World Trade Center tower

A woman who spent 13 years trying to find the owner of a wedding photo found in the rubble of the World Trade Center after the 9/11 attacks has been called ‘the best of humanity.’

Fred Mahe, who worked on the 77th floor of the second World Trade Center tower, had pinned the photo to his office cubicle, but did not expect to see it again after the terror attack in 2001.

But every September, Elizabeth Stringer Keefe has posted image of the six people at a wedding online to try and reunite it with its owner.

Yesterday she was finally successful after her tweet was re-posted 35,000 times and after Mr Mahe saw it he sent Ms Stringer Keefe a message on LinkedIn.

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