Woman hurt in 1993 World Trade Center bombing loses $5.4 million award from Port Authority

By Dareh Gregorian New York Daily News

A jury awarded Linda Nash after she suffered a head injury, brain damage and lung scarring in the attack, but the state Court of Appeals excluded the Port Authority in another lawsuit related to the terror attack and prompted the award’s withdrawal.

New York City police and firefighters inspect the bomb crater inside the World Trade Center on Feb. 27, 1993, one day after the fatal attack by an Islamic faction. Six people were killed and more than 1,000 injured in the bombing. Richard Drew/Associated Press

New York City police and firefighters inspect the bomb crater inside the World Trade Center on Feb. 27, 1993, one day after the fatal attack by an Islamic faction. Six people were killed and more than 1,000 injured in the bombing. Richard Drew/Associated Press

A woman who suffered devastating injuries in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing was stripped her of $5.4 million jury award against the Port Authority Tuesday.

Linda Nash won the multimillion-dollar verdict in 2009, after waiting 16 years for her day in court against the agency.

She argued that its poor security at the WTC opened the door for the truck bombing that killed six and injured more than 1,000.

Nash, then an accounting exec at Deloitte and Touche, was in the twin towers’ underground garage when the bomb went off there.

“I got pushed to the ground. I felt like I’d been hit with a 12-foot wave,” she testified.

She’d been hit in the head with debris and was trapped in the smoldering garage until she was rescued by firefighters, suffering brain damage and lung scarring as a result.

Nash had been able to sue the Port Authority after a jury found the agency was 68% responsible for the terror attack because it had ignored numerous warnings from security experts about the garage’s vulnerability to car bombs.

But in 2011 — two years after the Nash verdict — the state’s highest court, the Court of Appeals, excluded the PA from liability in another lawsuit. The PA used that ruling to argue the Nash case should be tossed as well.

In a 3-2 ruling, the state Appellate Division agreed that Nash’s judgment should be tossed because it was “based on an order that has been reversed.”

Nash now lives in Durango, Colo., raising horses.

Her lawyer, Lou Mangone, said he’d appeal the ruling

This entry was posted in 9/11 Community. Bookmark the permalink.